The Optimization of process of biodiesel produced via Acid catalysts using Sulfuric Acid, Hydrocloric acid and Nitric acid.

  • Shyamsing Thakur
Keywords: biodiesel, acid catalysis, Base Catalysis

Abstract

The consumption of nonrenewable resources like petroleum fuels is on peak and increased exponentially in past decades, the supply of such resources may end after few decades. The harmful effects pollution, green house gases increasing very rapidly. The development of renewable, cleaner and safer energy sources is an essential to survive. Total energy indepence on petroleum based fuels by development of biodiesel may become possible. In the present work biodiesel is produced by Waste Cocking oil (WCO) by acid catalysis followed by conventional base catalysis. Free Fatty Acid (FFA) level is increased after each fry in cooking oil which increases cancerous and unhealthy chemicals. If such higher FFA level waste fried oil directly used for biodiesel production via conventional base catalysis tends to more soap formation and wastage of base catalyst which in terms difficult the separation of glycerin and biodiesel production. By using acid catalyst the FFA level can be reduce considerably and biodiesel can be produce by base catalysis. In the present work, different acid catalysts like Sulfuric acid, Hydrocloric acid and Nitric acid are used for the biodiesel production.

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Published
2018-04-15
How to Cite
Thakur, S. (2018, April 15). The Optimization of process of biodiesel produced via Acid catalysts using Sulfuric Acid, Hydrocloric acid and Nitric acid. ASIAN JOURNAL FOR CONVERGENCE IN TECHNOLOGY (AJCT ) -UGC LISTED, 4(I). https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.33130/asian%20journals.v4iI.428
Section
Mechnical Engineering